Supple fishbot survives jaunt to the deepest part of the ocean

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The morphology and skull structure of one of these marine organisms, the hadal snailfish (slightly similar to the tidepool snailfish shown above), apparently inspired the style of this exceptional robotic swimmer.The primary development that allowed this considerable achievement was a specially-designed certified polymer body which deforms, without breaking, under high pressure. The group of scientists from Hangzhou in China were able to embed the delicate electronic elements required for power, movement and control in a protective silicone matrix.The electronic components were separated from each other, instead of being tightly loaded together as is the typical practice, to make them more resilient to the pressure, comparable to the skull bones of the snailfish.The robot likewise looks like the snailfish, with an extended body and tail, as well as two big side fins made of thin silicone. They are developed exploiting the benefits of compliant products like silicone and other polymers, gels or even textiles.These robotics can bend, yield and adjust in action to forces from their environment, so are naturally more secure to work next to humans compared to the typical rigid industrial robots.

This short article by Dimitris Tsakiris, Reader in Intelligent Robotics, Aberystwyth University, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original post.

The morphology and skull structure of one of these marine organisms, the hadal snailfish (vaguely similar to the tidepool snailfish revealed above), apparently motivated the design of this exceptional robotic swimmer.The primary advancement that enabled this significant achievement was a specially-designed certified polymer body which deforms, without breaking, under high pressure. The group of scientists from Hangzhou in China were able to embed the delicate electronic components required for power, motion and control in a protective silicone matrix.The electronic components were separated from each other, instead of being tightly packed together as is the normal practice, to make them more resistant to the pressure, similar to the skull bones of the snailfish.The robotic also looks like the snailfish, with an extended body and tail, as well as 2 large side fins made of thin silicone. They are developed exploiting the advantages of certified products like silicone and other polymers, gels or even textiles.These robots can flex, yield and adjust in reaction to forces from their environment, so are naturally safer to work next to humans compared to the normal stiff industrial robots.